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Park City

Park City Named Top 10 Finalist in Outside Magazine’s “Best Towns”

1imagesPark City, Utah, has been named a top ten finalist in Outside Magazine’s “Best Towns” competition.  The winner will be decided via Facebook voting where participants can vote for their favorite finalist beginning today.

Outside Magazine selected America’s top ten best towns based on nine categories including food and nightlife, access to green space, skiing, biking, surfing, paddling, running, great gyms and sports shops, and low commute time.  The winner of the “Best Towns” competition receives a feature story in the September issue of Outside Magazine portraying the reasons why the destination deserves this honor.

The top ten finalists are featured on Outside Magazine’s Facebook page where the public is encouraged to cast their vote for their favorite town. Outside Magazine fans are able to vote once a day for the destination of their choice today through June 13, 2013, when voting concludes.

Voters can also enter to win a five-day adventure to one of the top ten finalist destinations. To cast a vote, the public is invited to visit www.facebook.com/outsidemagazine.

Park City is North America’s most accessible mountain recreation destination, located just 35 minutes from Salt Lake City International Airport. Home to three world-class ski resorts, over 400 miles of public trails, and more than 100 restaurants, Park City offers a mountain range of possibilities.

Museum Wants 50 Years of Skiing Memories

imagesIn December, 1963, Park City Mountain Resort opened for skiing as Treasure Mountains Resort.  Since this year marks the resort’s 50-year anniversary, the Park City Museum will open an original exhibit, “50 Years of Park City Skiing” in November.

To find items and collect oral history stories about locals and visitors’ experiences at the resort over the past half-decade, the museum, 528 Main St., is hosting a night of show and tell on Thursday, April 25, from 5 p.m. until 7 p.m.  During the free and casual event, the museum’s staff will get ideas of what to display, said Jenette Purdy, the museum’s director of education.

“We thought it would be a fun event one night where people brought the things they have collected over the years while skiing at PCMR and share them with each other,” Purdy told The Park Record. “The museum, of course, loves objects and artifacts, but we also love stories. They sometimes make things more interesting, and it’s fun to hear about how things were.”

The museum will set up tables where people can lay out their items.  “They’ll be able talk with each other about where the items came from, and tell their stories,” Purdy said. “We will record some of the stories if people will allow us.”

The museum hopes the winter exhibit will include an interactive display where museum visitors will be able to climb into a gondola and hear these stories.  “We may have to rerecord the stories at a later date, because I’m sure Thursday will be noisy with all the other people who will be in attendance, but we want to get some of that history down,” she said. West Office Exhibition Design, which built the museum’s permanent display, will design “50 Year of Park City Skiing,” Purdy said.

“Right now, we don’t have any set plan to have specific stories and items, but we want to have fun memories we can show,” she said. “As for the objects, we just want to see what people have and then we’ll go from there.”

Click here to read the entire article.

 

Park City Construction Numbers Rise from 2012 Tally

imagesThe Park City construction industry enjoyed a solid month in March, outpacing the figures from February and the previous March, the Park City Building Department said.  According to the department, 62 permits were issued worth a little more than $4.1 million combined. The dollar figure climbed sharply from the little less than $1.2 million in permits issued in February and the just more than $1.3 million tallied in the previous March.  Through the end of March, the year-to-date total reached to nearly $6 million, up from the $4.9 million through the same period in 2012.

The March numbers are likely encouraging since it is a month when construction crews often seek the permits they need to break ground later in the spring or the early summer. The 2013 dollar figure was roughly triple those from March 2012.  The department in March issued one permit for a duplex, valued at a little less than $1.1 million, and one permit for a three-unit multifamily building. The building is valued at $998,271.84.  Alterations and additions, though, continued to push up the figures. The Building Department said it issued 45 permits for alterations and additions, valued at a just more than $2 million combined. Most of the permits, as well as the dollar value, were generated from residential properties. Alterations and additions have had an outsized impact on the numbers since the recession as owners chose to work on their existing properties instead of building new ones. Those sorts of permits, though, are typically not as valuable as ones issued for new projects.

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City Hall May Sack the Use of Plastic Bags in Park City

imagesMike Holm would be one of the Park City businesspeople most impacted should City Hall institute a ban on plastic bags.  The owner of The Market at Park City said in an interview this week a ban would add expenses to his operations, annoy some customers and not accomplish much for the environment. He is unsure whether he would support or oppose such a ban but said he would back the decision the local government makes.

The Market at Park City is almost certainly one of the top users of plastic bags in Park City, and his comments come as City Hall and the not-for-profit Recycle Utah continue to consider ideas. A law has not been proposed, but it seems that one could be crafted in the coming months. Holm said the grocery store uses both paper and plastic bags. Plastic bags are far more popular with customers, he said, describing them as easier to handle when they are full of groceries and less bulky than paper bags.

In a month during the ski season, The Market at Park City might distribute 80,000 bags to customers. Of those, fewer than 1,000 might be made of paper, he said. The grocery store pays one-half of one cent for a plastic bag while it costs five to seven cents for each paper bag, according to Holm. The Market at Park City, meanwhile, provides a five-cent credit per bag if someone brings their own bags to use.

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Decision Expected Next Month on Park City Casino

imagesWyandotte nation Chief Billy Friend tells KWCH News he expects a federal ruling next month that would force the U.S. government to accept or reject the tribe’s application to open a casino in Park City.

The tribe has been fighting since 2006 to develop a casino, but the decision-making agency, the U.S. Department of the Interior, has taken no action.

The state of Kansas has opposed the casino, which wouldn’t be far from the recently opened state-owned Kansas Star Casino.

Park City End of Year Statistics Report for 2012

park-city-ski-resort-night-skiing_500The year-end 2012 statistical report released by the Park City Board of REALTORS® indicates an increase in the number of sales and total dollar volume, with inventory the lowest it has been in over six years. It also shows a slight gain in median prices compared to 2011. The total volume of real estate sold for the entire market area (Summit and Wasatch Counties) reached $1,240,542,783 in 2012 — a 15% increase over 2011.

The number of sales continued to climb in 2012 with a nine percent increase over 2011 in all property types combined, reaching 1,817 total transactions. This is up 61% over the low point in 2009. The number of sales now surpasses the early 2000’s and is approaching the number of sales necessary to be termed a more balanced market. Sales for the year were very strong after the first quarter of 2012. Each of the last three quarters averaged over 150 sales more than the first quarter. Quarter Four is up 28% compared to the fourth quarter of 2011.

Click here to read the entire article. 

Your Guide to Buying a Rural Property in the Rocky Mountains

imagesThe Rocky Mountains offer many pristine, rural properties, ranches and farm houses for sale.  Here are ten pieces of advice to keep in mind before buying:

  1. Is the water supply public or private? If it’s well water, you should have it tested to check for chemicals or other harmful components.
  2. Does the house have adequate septic? When a house is constructed in a rural area, a leach field is built to collect sewage and water waste. Make sure the leach field is the proper size to avoid costly construction bills down the road.
  3. Is the house on a private road? If so, you could be facing thousands of dollars in extra expenses each year, as you’ll be forced to split the bill with your fellow residents for plowing, maintenance and paving.
  4. Has the area ever experienced a major power outage? If so, how long was the power out?
  5. How is the air quality? Ask about radon levels and smog levels from any nearby manufacturing plants.
  6. What is the average snowfall? How does the town handle major snowstorms?
  7. Where are the boundary lines? Make sure the property divisions are clear and established.
  8. Who handles trash pickup? Is there a nearby dumping ground?
  9. Are there any deed and zoning restrictions?
  10. How difficult is it to maintain the property?

Park City Mountain Resort Launches New Teen-Specific Group-Ride Program

i-ride-park-city-logoPark City Mountain Resort introduces a new way for skiers and snowboarders ages 15-17 to discover the mountain in a group all their own with its newest spring instruction program, Teen Select.

From mellow groomers to our Signature Runs and powder-filled bowls, Teen Select groups, never larger than four kids to an instructor, explore the entire mountain, with each group making its own unique experience appropriate to its ability level – even getting off the mountain and exploring downtown Park City for lunch, if they choose! Teen Select participants leave the days of kids ski school behind, without being stuck with their parents, and develop their skills while making friends with a group of kids their own age.

The one-day Teen Select program is open to 15-17 year old skiers and snowboarders who are comfortable on green terrain and above, and runs 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Sundays, Mondays and Tuesdays this spring: March 10-12, 17-19, 24-26, 31 and April 1-2.

Learn more about Teen Select here.

The Best Town in America: Park City, Utah

park-city-utah-best-towns_fe“Know how I can tell that’s a local?” asks Dana Williams, the 58-year-old mayor of Park City, Utah, nodding toward a fit thirty-something guy in a flat-brimmed baseball hat. “The bandaged wrist.”

Park City feels like a Colorado ski town dropped into Utah’s 12,000-foot Wasatch Range, with one significant difference. Unlike Telluride or Aspen, it has a major city, Salt Lake, and an international airport 30 minutes away. Local love for Park City can feel a little over the top—it got two-thirds as many votes in our contest (5,179) as it has residents. To see if that affection was justified, I parachuted in for a 72-hour, Chamber of Commerce–led recon tour. What I found was a town that breeds the active lifestyle.

In winter, Parkites can access three world-class ski areas from town: Deer Valley, Park City, and the Canyons. Then there’s climbing, hiking, and camping in 500,000 acres of wilderness in the nearby Uinta Mountains, 370-plus miles of trails, a blue-ribbon trout stream (the Provo River), and an Olympic training center built for the 2002 Salt Lake Games. More than 100 Olympians still live here. There are also lax(er) liquor laws than elsewhere in the Beehive State—and Utah’s first distillery since Prohibition, High West.

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No Snow Necessary: Ski Resorts Deliver Summer Fun

1374235970000-4x4Tour-1307190814_4_3“I came for the winter, but stayed for the summer.”

It’s a well-worn cliché employed by one-time ski bums who quickly grasped the appeal of ski-town living after the snow melted, the temperatures rose and the wildflowers bloomed.

In recent years, top ski destinations have beefed up their warm-weather offerings to lure visitors. Most large ski resorts offer world-class golf and mountain biking. Many are adding bells and high-altitude whistles like man-made whitewater parks, ziplines and much more. The bonus? Bargain rates at some of the region’s swankiest spots.

“In the summertime, travelers can experience the same luxurious lodging and dine at the same world-class restaurants for a fraction of the price,” says Dan Sherman of Ski.com, which sells mountain vacation packages. “We have found that travelers can snag deals with savings of up to 85-percent off the most expensive travel times in winter.”

Wow, you say? That’s what we thought, too.

Here are some places to spend a spectacular summer in the mountains.